GDPR Compliance: The Golden Rules

GDPR Compliance: The Golden Rules

Jason Dewar provides his golden rules to help your organisation become GDPR compliant.  

With the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) implementation date now just around the corner, organisations will be undertaking the substantial task of ensuring they are compliant with this latest legislation.

The GDPR is the most important change in data privacy regulation in 20 years. It will have a significant impact on how organisations process and protect their data. To help you check you’re heading in the right direction, we’ve provided some advice given by Context’s Jason Dewar, Security & Compliance Manager, in our recent webinar on GDPR.

Jason explained his golden rules for addressing compliance requirements:

  1. FIND OUT WHERE THE PERSONAL DATA IS
    This is the first and one of the most fundamental steps. Personal data is “any information related to a natural person or ‘Data Subject’ that can be used to directly or indirectly identify the person". Once you know where all of the personal data is located, you can find out who has access to it, how it is processed, where it has come from and begin to put in safeguards to become GDPR compliant. If you haven’t done so already, do this as soon as possible.
     
  2. MANAGE AND MONITOR THE SUPPLY CHAIN
    Make sure you’re aware of the data you’re sharing and ensure compliance from any third parties. In most circumstances each third party that has access to your data should provide you with a legal and contractual agreement to protect the rights of data subjects. This includes those outside of the EU, any organisation that processes an EU citizen’s data must be compliant with this legislation, irrelevant of their own jurisdiction.
     
  3. MINIMISE DATA AND IMPLEMENT STRICT RETENTION POLICIES
    Ensure you only hold the data you require and that you have a process for erasing old data you no longer need.
     
  4. IDENTIFY ALL RELEVANT LEGISLATION – NOT JUST THE GDPR
    Make sure you are aware of all legislation that affects the data you hold; for example, other legislation may require you to hold data for a particular length of time after its use – this would be a legitimate reason under the GDPR for you retaining that data.
     
  5. CONTROL ACCESS TO THE INFORMATION
    Ensure that only those who need access to the data have that access, and that this access is justifiable and appropriate.
     
  6. ESTABLISH AND DOCUMENT A LEGAL JUSTIFICATION FOR PROCESSING
    In order to process data you must have a lawful basis to do so which is clearly documented. There are six available bases under GDPR; these bases can be found in Article 6, they include consent, contract, legal obligation, vital interests, public task and legitimate interest.
     
  7. INFORM DATA SUBJECTS OF WHAT YOU’RE DOING WITH THEIR DATA & WHO HAS ACCESS TO IT
    The data subject generally has a right to know why personal data is being processed about them, what data is processed and who processes it. You need to explicitly inform data subjects of the specific purpose that you are processing their data for and you shouldn’t deviate from this without good reason. It should also be clear who they can contact about the data that is held about them.
     
  8. HAVE AN INCIDENT RESPONSE PLAN
    Should you suffer a breach to any personal data that you may hold, an organisation with an effective Incident Response Plan (IRP) is in the best position. This is likely to reduce the time it takes to find out you have a breach and therefore, reduce the potential loss of data and / or damage to your organisation. Within this IRP ensure you include your breach notification process - Data breaches which may pose a risk to individuals must be notified to the DPA within 72 hours and to affected individuals without undue delay.
     
  9. DON’T BUY OR SELL BULK DATA SETS
    This isn’t a requirement of the GDPR but we’d suggest you avoid bulk data sets if possible. The intention of the GDPR is to give EU citizens more control over their data so the sale or purchase of bulk data must be very closely controlled or is likely to contradict that objective.
     
  10. REMEMBER COMPLIANCE IS ONGOING
    Once you have implemented the necessary controls and measures you are part way there but maintaining compliance is an ongoing requirement and requires continual management control. Think about establishing roles and responsibilities which include GDPR.

Becoming compliant with the GDPR will certainly be a significant task for many organisations; however, it is intended to drive better behaviours within corporate environments. If done effectively, these improved policies and processes should improve an organisation’s overall security posture, create more accurate and up-to-date data and will protect and enhance the reputation of the organisation. As individuals we can see the benefits of having control over our personal data to prevent others from exploiting it for their own financial gain; with an increased emphasis put on the data controllers we can be reassured in this respect.

If you would like to know more about GDPR you can listen to the recording of our webinar here, or get in touch to find out how we can help.

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